• Choosing Our Blessings: Thoughts for Parashat Naso

    When we pray for blessings on ourselves and our families, do we really know if we are asking for the right things?
  • A “(Post-)Modern” Rabbinic Idea of Equality

    The respect shown for the other is a yardstick of measuring the development (some would say morality) of a society. Further, it is thus impossible for an individual or community to have a genuine relationship with God, if…
  • The Humility of an Open Mind: Thoughts for Shavuot…

    As we celebrate the Shavuoth festival commemorating the Revelation at Mount Sinai, it would be appropriate for us to recall the symbolic virtues of Mount Sinai—humility, awareness of limitations, openness to new and unique…
  • A WOMAN OF VALOR HAS BEEN FOUND

    Megillat Ruth is characterized by deliberate ambiguity. Not only are multiple readings possible; these ambiguities are precisely the vehicles through which the short narrative captures so many subtleties in so short a space.

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When we pray for blessings on ourselves and our families, do we really know if we are asking for the right things?
The respect shown for the other is a yardstick of measuring the development (some would say morality) of a society. Further, it is thus impossible for an individual or community to have a genuine relationship with God, if that individual or society mistreats the other.
As we celebrate the Shavuoth festival commemorating the Revelation at Mount Sinai, it would be appropriate for us to recall the symbolic virtues of Mount Sinai—humility, awareness of limitations, openness to new and unique revelation.
Megillat Ruth is characterized by deliberate ambiguity. Not only are multiple readings possible; these ambiguities are precisely the vehicles through which the short narrative captures so many subtleties in so short a space.
Over and over, the Torah lays it out for us. God, family, community, nation, world. Take as much responsibility for the relationships and institutions closest to you and work toward your goals. What is the responsibility the Torah wants us to take? Which step do we take first?
On Sunday, June 23, Rabbi Hayyim Angel will again participate in the annual Bible Study Days held at SAR High School in Riverdale, New York (503 West 259th Street, Bronx). Our Institute is a co-sponsor of this program.