Angel for Shabbat

Rabbi Marc D. Angel offers thoughts for discussion at your Shabbat table. Please visit this column each week, and invite your fa

Leadership Styles: Thoughts on Parashat Ki Tissa

Angel for Shabbat, Parashat Ki Tissa by Rabbi Marc D. Angel

As Moses descended from the mountain with the Tablets of the Covenant, he heard a great commotion from the Israelite camp. Joshua, Moses’ faithful attendant, stated: “There is a noise of war in the camp.” Moses corrected Joshua. The noise wasn’t warlike, but rather was the sound of singing.

Indeed, what Moses and Joshua heard was the tumult created by the Israelites celebrating around the golden calf! Joshua had erred in his evaluation of the situation.

 

Living Up To Our Uniforms: Thoughts for Parashat Tetsaveh

People wear uniforms…athletes, police, firefighters, surgeons, clergy. Graduates don caps and gowns. Marching bands have their uniforms. Top hats and tails, formal gowns, business attire…each uniform is meant to define a particular role or a particular occasion. When people dress casually so that they think they are not wearing uniforms…they are wearing casual uniforms! The way they dress is meant to reflect their conformity with or rebellion from the current fashions.

Listening to the Revelation: Thoughts for Parashat Yitro

Albert Einstein commented on the nature of Jewish ideals: "The pursuit of knowledge for its own sake, an almost fanatical love of justice, and the desire for personal independence--these are the features of the Jewish tradition which make me thank my stars that I belong to it." (The World as I See It, p. 103).

Einstein believed that Jewish civilization was magnificent and unique in cultivating education, justice and personal autonomy. It provides the moral and intellectual framework for individuals to achieve personal fulfillment and to be constructive members of society.

We Jews, like Einstein, should "thank our stars" that we belong to the Jewish tradition.

Israel at War

Our prayers are with the people of Israel as they once again are compelled to defend themselves against the forces of terror, hatred and destruction. We pray that the time will come, speedily and soon, when Israel and its neighbors will live in peace and friendship, enabling all the people of the region to prosper and enjoy God's blessings.

Overcoming the Disease of Hatred: Thoughts for Parashat Vayeshev

Joseph’s brothers learned to overcome jealousy and hatred. They learned to escape the “syndrome of decay” that eats away at the fiber of life. They learned that life is not a zero sum game; that their winning did not depend on someone else losing; that all humans could live so much more happily and meaningfully if they adopted a syndrome of love and cooperation.