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In recent years, there seems to be a proliferation of kasher food products that contain multiple rabbinic supervisions (hashgahot). If you buy a box of cookies or a packaged cake, you are likely to find several symbols of competing kashruth agencies. Why isn't one hashgaha enough?

(The following essay was written by Joe Behar, a retired teacher, on a topic that should concern all of us. Readers are invited to share their views and experiences on this topic, by entering their comments on this blog site.)

I feel a profound sadness on learning of the passing of Professor Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi. He was one of the great teachers and Jewish historians of our era, having taught at Harvard and Columbia Universities, and having written so many important works.

 

 In October 2007, Rabbi Avi Weiss and I convened a group of Modern Orthodox rabbis for a conference in West Palm Beach.

In recent years, there seems to be a proliferation of kasher food products that contain multiple rabbinic supervisions (hashgahot). If you buy a box of cookies or a packaged cake, you are likely to find several symbols of competing kashruth agencies. Why isn't one hashgaha enough?

(The following essay was written by Joe Behar, a retired teacher, on a topic that should concern all of us. Readers are invited to share their views and experiences on this topic, by entering their comments on this blog site.)

I feel a profound sadness on learning of the passing of Professor Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi. He was one of the great teachers and Jewish historians of our era, having taught at Harvard and Columbia Universities, and having written so many important works.

 

 In October 2007, Rabbi Avi Weiss and I convened a group of Modern Orthodox rabbis for a conference in West Palm Beach.