Blogs

In recent years, there seems to be a proliferation of kasher food products that contain multiple rabbinic supervisions (hashgahot). If you buy a box of cookies or a packaged cake, you are likely to find several symbols of competing kashruth agencies. Why isn't one hashgaha enough?

 

 In October 2007, Rabbi Avi Weiss and I convened a group of Modern Orthodox rabbis for a conference in West Palm Beach.

 

Rabbi Daniel Rosen comments on Daniel Schwartz’s article, “I Dread Going to Shul”, that appeared in issue 9 of Conversations, the journal of the Institute for Jewish Ideas and Ideals, and which is posted on the Institute’s website, jewishideas.org

A terrible crime recently made the headlines in Israel. A well-known rabbi, reputed to be a wonder-worker, had a large following of supporters who sought his prayers and blessings. One such follower came to him to seek a prayer/blessing so that a certain result would ensue.

In recent years, there seems to be a proliferation of kasher food products that contain multiple rabbinic supervisions (hashgahot). If you buy a box of cookies or a packaged cake, you are likely to find several symbols of competing kashruth agencies. Why isn't one hashgaha enough?

 

 In October 2007, Rabbi Avi Weiss and I convened a group of Modern Orthodox rabbis for a conference in West Palm Beach.

 

Rabbi Daniel Rosen comments on Daniel Schwartz’s article, “I Dread Going to Shul”, that appeared in issue 9 of Conversations, the journal of the Institute for Jewish Ideas and Ideals, and which is posted on the Institute’s website, jewishideas.org

A terrible crime recently made the headlines in Israel. A well-known rabbi, reputed to be a wonder-worker, had a large following of supporters who sought his prayers and blessings. One such follower came to him to seek a prayer/blessing so that a certain result would ensue.