Blogs

 

 In October 2007, Rabbi Avi Weiss and I convened a group of Modern Orthodox rabbis for a conference in West Palm Beach.

Question:  When is it proper to be extra strict in the observance of the kosher laws?

 

 Consider:

 

1.              Show devotion to Heaven by being extra strict

 

Rabbi Daniel Rosen comments on Daniel Schwartz’s article, “I Dread Going to Shul”, that appeared in issue 9 of Conversations, the journal of the Institute for Jewish Ideas and Ideals, and which is posted on the Institute’s website, jewishideas.org

 

 

I keep asking Orthodox rabbis, “How  would shabbat morning services be any different if every woman in the community stayed home?” Interestingly, the responses are uniform: “We would feel bad, but in practice, nothing would change.”

A terrible crime recently made the headlines in Israel. A well-known rabbi, reputed to be a wonder-worker, had a large following of supporters who sought his prayers and blessings. One such follower came to him to seek a prayer/blessing so that a certain result would ensue.

SHE-LO ASSANI ISHA– A CRITIQUE OF CONTEMPORARY “BLOGGIC” DISCOURSE

 

By Rabbi Zev Farber

The Israeli newspaper, Haaretz, recently reported:

(Harry Zeitlin is a Seattle rabbi and teacher, as well as a visual artist and a musician. His blog is rabbizeitlin.wordpress.com)

Jewish Guilt, at least the European/western/Ashkenazi stereotype, is a cliché that is featured in much our unique, Jewish humor, and it is often seen as a positive trait that reflects our traditional values of personal responsibility and hard work. Although it has the potential to effectively cripple us, we are rather fond and protective of it. However, it's capacity for damage shouldn't be taken lightly.

 

 In October 2007, Rabbi Avi Weiss and I convened a group of Modern Orthodox rabbis for a conference in West Palm Beach.

Question:  When is it proper to be extra strict in the observance of the kosher laws?

 

 Consider:

 

1.              Show devotion to Heaven by being extra strict

 

Rabbi Daniel Rosen comments on Daniel Schwartz’s article, “I Dread Going to Shul”, that appeared in issue 9 of Conversations, the journal of the Institute for Jewish Ideas and Ideals, and which is posted on the Institute’s website, jewishideas.org

 

 

I keep asking Orthodox rabbis, “How  would shabbat morning services be any different if every woman in the community stayed home?” Interestingly, the responses are uniform: “We would feel bad, but in practice, nothing would change.”

A terrible crime recently made the headlines in Israel. A well-known rabbi, reputed to be a wonder-worker, had a large following of supporters who sought his prayers and blessings. One such follower came to him to seek a prayer/blessing so that a certain result would ensue.

SHE-LO ASSANI ISHA– A CRITIQUE OF CONTEMPORARY “BLOGGIC” DISCOURSE

 

By Rabbi Zev Farber

The Israeli newspaper, Haaretz, recently reported:

(Harry Zeitlin is a Seattle rabbi and teacher, as well as a visual artist and a musician. His blog is rabbizeitlin.wordpress.com)

Jewish Guilt, at least the European/western/Ashkenazi stereotype, is a cliché that is featured in much our unique, Jewish humor, and it is often seen as a positive trait that reflects our traditional values of personal responsibility and hard work. Although it has the potential to effectively cripple us, we are rather fond and protective of it. However, it's capacity for damage shouldn't be taken lightly.