Angel for Shabbat

Thoughts About Thinking: Thoughts on Parashat Nitzavim

The Torah calls on us to think, to evaluate, and to act righteously. It challenges us to serve the Almighty with our intelligence and personal responsibility; not from blind obedience.The Torah is not an esoteric document that can be deciphered only by an elite group of prophets or sages; rather, it is the heritage of the entire people. Each of us has access to the truths of the Torah by means of our own intellectual and emotional efforts.

A Parable: Thoughts for Parashat Haazinu

There was once a king who had two advisers. The advisers had a luxurious life as long as they bowed to the whims of the king. The king’s whims were many. He often made unreasonable demands. He was harsh in his criticisms. He expected the advisers to be at his service constantly. He humiliated them by always reminding them that he was their superior, that he could order them around at will. As long as they complied, he rewarded them generously.

The Business of Life--Thoughts for Succoth

The hallmark of who we are as a Jewish people is our commitment to humanity—our own humanity and the humanity of others.  We rebel against oppression; we reject the philosophy of business is business, that profits come first; we embrace social responsibility and mutual trust. Each of us who strives to live by these Jewish ideals is a moral hero who defies the dehumanizing tendencies evident in our society.

Time to Stand Tall--Thoughts for Parashat Vayelekh

Quiet piety and self-effacing righteousness are great virtues. Yet, when we need to make a public stand on behalf of our people--then we should set aside our humility and step forward with self-confidence. When the honor and well-being of our people are at stake, we dare not shy away from responsibility. When evil persists in the world, we may not let humility get in the way of forceful resistance to evil.

Anti-Semitism--an Affront to Humanity and to God--Thoughts for Parashat Shofetim

Each generation of Jewish parents and grandparents seems to face the same dilemma. We teach our children and grandchildren that all humans are created in the image of God; that we should respect and assist others; that love of God necessarily entails love of God’s creations. This week's Torah reading teaches: tsedek tsedek tirdof, pursue justice. Repetition of the word tsedek emphasizes that justice is not easily attained; it requires vigilance, clear thinking, honest and fair treatment of others.